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Alcestis

By: Euripides

CHARACTERS IN THE PLAY APOLLO DEATH CHORUS OF OLD MEN A WOMAN SERVANT ALCESTIS, the Queen, wife of ADMETUS ADMETUS, King of Thessaly EUMELUS, their child HERACLES PHERES, father of ADMETUS A MAN SERVANT (SCENE:-At Pherae, outside the Palace of ADMETUS, King of Thessaly. The centre of the scene represents a portico with columns and a large double-door. To the left are the women's quarters, to the right the guest rooms. The centre doors of the Palace slowly open inwards, a...

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The Deuterocanonical Books of the Bible, Known as the Apocrypha

The First Book of Esdras: -- 1Esdr 1:1 And Josias held the feast of the passover in Jerusalem unto his Lord, and offered the passover the fourteenth day of the first month; -- 1Esdr 1:2 Having set the priests according to their daily courses, being arrayed in long garments, in the temple of the Lord. -- 1Esdr 1:3 And he spake unto the Levites, the holy ministers of Israel, that they should hallow themselves unto the Lord, to set the holy ark of the Lord in the house that...

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What Katy Did Next

By: Susan Coolidge

The September sun was glinting cheerfully into a pretty bedroom furnished with blue. It danced on the glossy hair and bright eyes of two girls, who sat together hemming ruffles for a white muslin dress. The half-finished skirt of the dress lay on the bed, and as each crisp ruffle was completed, the girls added it to the snowy heap, which looked like a drift of transparent clouds or a pile of foamy white of egg beaten stiff enough to stand alone. These girls were Clover a...

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Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

By: George M. Gould

Excerpt: PREFATORY AND Introductory Note. Since the time when man?s mind first busied itself with subjects beyond his own self?preservation and the satisfaction of his bodily appetites, the anomalous and curious have been of exceptional and persistent fascination to him; and especially is this true of the construction and functions of the human body. Possibly, indeed, it was the anomalous that was largely instrumental in arousing in the savage the attention, thought, and...

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Arizona Nights

By: Stewart Edward White

CHAPTER ONE, THE OLE VIRGINIA: The ring around the sun had thickened all day long, and the urquoise blue of the Arizona sky had filmed. Storms in the dry countries are infrequent, but heavy; and this surely meant storm. We had ridden since sun-up over broad mesas, down and out of deep canons, along the base of the mountain in the wildest parts of the territory. The cattle were winding leisurely toward he high country; the jack rabbits had disappeared; the quail lacked; w...

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The Covent-Garden Tragedy

By: Henry Fielding

In Athens first (as Dictionaries write) The Tragick Muse was midwif'd into Light; Rome knew her next, and next she took a Dance, Some say to England, others say to France. But when, or whence, the tuneful Goddess came, Since she is here, I think, is much the same: Oft have you seen the King and Hero rage, Oft has the Virgin's Passion fill'd the Stage; To-night, nor King, nor Hero shall you spy, Nor Virgin's Love shall fill the Virgin's Eye. Our Poet from unknown, untaste...

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Getting Gold

By: J.C.F. Johnson

Preface: Some six years ago the author published a small book entitled ?Practical Mining,? designed specially for the use of those engaged in the always fascinating, though not as invariably profitable, pursuit of ?Getting Gold.? Of this ten thousand copies were sold, nearly all in Australasia, and the work is now out of print. The London Mining Journal of September 9th, 1891, said of it: ?We have seldom seen a book in which so much interesting matter combined with usefu...

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War and Peace, Volume 3

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

Prince Vasili was not a man who deliberately thought out his plans. Still less did he think of injuring anyone for his own advantage. He was merely a man of the world who had got on and to whom getting on had become a habit. Schemes and devices for which he never rightly accounted to himself, but which formed the whole interest of his life, were constantly shaping themselves in his mind, arising from the circumstances and persons he met. Of these plans he had not merely ...

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American Notes

By: Rudyard Kipling

Introduction: In an issue of the London World in April, 1890, there appeared the following paragraph: ?Two small rooms connected by a tiny hall afford sufficient space to contain Mr. Rudyard Kipling, the literary hero of the present hour, ?the man who came from nowhere,? as he says himself, and who a year ago was consciously nothing in the literary world.? Six months previous to this Mr. Kipling, then but twenty?four years old, had arrived in England from India to find t...

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The Light Princess

By: George Macdonald

Excerpt: Once upon a time, so long ago that I have quite forgotten the date, there lived a king and queen who had no children. And the king said to himself, ?All the queens of my acquaintance have children, some three, some seven, and some as many as twelve; and my queen has not one. I feel ill?used.? So he made up his mind to be cross with his wife about it. But she bore it all like a good patient queen as she was. Then the king grew very cross indeed. But the queen pre...

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What the Animals Do and Say

By: Eliza Lee Follen

Could you not tell us a traveller's story of some strange people that we have never heard of before? said Harry to his mother, the next evening. After a moment or two of thought, Mis. Chilton said, Yes, I will tell you about a people who are great travellers. They take journeys every year of their lives. They dislike cold weather so much that they go always before winter, so as to find a warmer climate....

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Lanier in the Valley

By: Elia Wilkinson Peattie

Excerpt: BECAUSE Lanier looked down the purple valley, Its beauty wears for me a deeper glow; From the sweet gloom of shadowy recesses Some essence of his spirit seems to flow.

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Tarzan the Terrible

By: Edgar Rice Burroughs

Excerpt: 1. The Pithecanthropus Silent as the shadows through which he moved, the great beast slunk through the midnight jungle, his yellow?green eyes round and staring, his sinewy tail undulating behind him, his head lowered and flattened, and every muscle vibrant to the thrill of the hunt. The jungle moon dappled an occasional clearing which the great cat was always careful to avoid. Though he moved through thick verdure across a carpet of innumerable twigs, broken bra...

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South

By: Sir Ernest Shackleton

Nay, but this dotage of our general's O'erflows the measure: those his goodly eyes, That o'er the files and musters of the war Have glow'd like plated Mars, now bend, now turn, The office and devotion of their view Upon a tawny front: his captain's heart, Which in the scuffles of great fights hath burst The buckles on his breast, reneges all temper, And is become the bellows and the fan To cool a gipsy's lust.

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The Quest of Happy Hearts

By: Kathleen Hay

Excerpt: ?Whoever heard of such a plan?a visit to Land?s End! The very name of the place suggests the last spot on the globe; a great old house set down on the edge of a forest; and Dad called off on business for an indefinite period, but seemingly content to ship us on a wild goose chase. He?s scarcely told us a word before of the place or of great?aunt Janice Meredith!? Nora?s tones were dismal indeed, as she rushed into the living room to join the other girls to discu...

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The Case of Mr. Lucraft

By: Walter Besant and James Rice

I HAVE more than once told the story of the only remarkable thing which ever happened to me in the course of a longish life, but as no one ever believed me, I left off telling it. I wish, therefore, to leave behind me a truthful record, in which everything shall be set down, as near as I can remember it, just as it happened. I am sure I need not add a single fact. The more I consider the story, the more I realise to myself my wonderful escape and the frightful consequenc...

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Pages

By: Stéphane Mallarmé

Le Phenomene Futur Un ciel pale, sur le monde qui finit de decrepitude, va peut-etre partir avec les nuages: les lambeaux de la pourpre usee des couchants deteignent dans une riviere dormant a l'horizon submerge de rayons et d'eau. Les arbres s'ennuient; et, sous leur feuillage blanchi (de la poussiere du temps, plutot que de celle des chemins), monte la maison en toile du Montreur de choses Passees: maint reverbere attend le crepuscule et ravive les visages d'une malheu...

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The Romance of Elaine

By: Arthur Benjamin Reeve

Excerpt: Chapter 1. THE SERPENT SIGN. Rescued by Kennedy at last from the terrible incubus of Bennett?s persecution in his double life of lawyer and master criminal, Elaine had, for the first time in many weeks, a feeling of security. Now that the strain was off, however, she felt that she needed rest and a chance to recover herself and it occurred to her that a few quiet days with ?Aunt? Tabitha, who had been her nurse when she was a little girl, would do her a world of...

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Troilus and Criseyde

By: Geoffrey Chaucer

Excerpt: BOOK I. The double sorwe of Troilus to tellen, That was the king Priamus sone of Troye, In lovinge, how his aventures fellen Fro wo to wele, and after out of Ioye, My purpos is, er that I parte fro ye. Thesiphone, thou help me for tendyte Thise woful vers, that wepen as I wryte! To thee clepe I, thou goddesse of torment, Thou cruel Furie, sorwing ever in peyne; Help me, that am the sorwful instrument That helpeth lovers, as I can, to pleyne! For wel sit it, the ...

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The Water Spectre

By: Francis Lathom

Muchardus, the usurping Thane of Dungivan, had murdered Roderic the late owner of that title, whom he had treacherously invited to an entertainment in a castle that he possessed on the banks of the Clyde. As soon as the banquet was nearly concluded, Roderic arose, courteously took leave of his entertainer and his guests, and descended the stairs. But he was not allowed to quit Boswell Castle. His faithful followers had been previously dispatched, and buried in one of the...

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