World Library  

Other People Who Read Middlemarch Also Read


 
  • Cover Image

The Inns and Taverns of Pickwick , With Some Observations on Their...

By: B. W. Matz

PREFACE: -- CHAPTER I. PICKWICK AND THE COACHING AGE -- CHAPTER II. THE GOLDEN CROSS, CHARING CROSS -- CHAPTER III. THE BULL, ROCHESTER, WRIGHT'S NEXT HOUSE AND THE BLUE LION, MUGGLETON -- CHAPTER IV. THE WHITE HART, BOROUGH -- CHAPTER V. LA BELLE SAUVAGE AND THE MARQUIS OF GRANBY, DORKING -- CHAPTER VI. THE LEATHER BOTTLE, COBHAM, KENT -- CHAPTER VII. THE TOWN ARMS, EATANSWILL, AND THE INN OF THE BAGMAN'S STORY -- CHAPTER VIII. THE ANGEL, BURY ST. EDMUNDS -- CHAPTER IX....

Read More
  • Cover Image

Myths and Legends of California and the Old Southwest

By: Katharine Berry Judson

Preface: In the beginning of the New?making, the ancient fathers lived successively in four caves in the Four fold?containing?earth. The first was of sooty blackness, black as a chimney at night time; the second, dark as the night in the stormy season; the third, like a valley in starlight; the fourth, with a light like the dawning. Then they came up in the night?shine into the World of Knowing and Seeing. So runs the Zuni myth, and it typifies well the mental developmen...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Down the Ravine

By: Charles Egbert Craddock

Excerpt: Chapter 1. THE new moon, a gleaming scimitar, cleft the gauzy mists above a rugged spur of the Cumberland Mountains. The sky, still crimson and amber, stretched vast and lonely above the vast and lonely landscape. A fox was barking in the laurel. This was an imprudent proceeding on the part of the fox, considering the value of his head?gear. A young mountaineer down the ravine was reminded, by the sharp, abrupt sound, of a premium offered by the State of Tenness...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Demonstrations by Syllogisms That God the Word Is Immutable

By: Theodoret, Theologian of Syria

Excerpt: I. We have confessed one substance of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, and have agreed that it is immutable. If then there is one substance of the Trinity, and it is immutable, then the only begotten Son, who is one person of the Trinity, is immutable. And, if He is immutable, He was not made flesh by mutation, but is said to have been made flesh after taking flesh.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Reminiscences of Ralph Waldo Emerson

By: Louisa May Alcott

Excerpt: As I count it the greatest honor and happiness of my life to have known Mr. Emerson, I gladly accede to a request for such recollections as may be of interest to the young readers for whom I ?

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Informal Execution of Soupbone Pew

By: Damon Runyon

My first duty this evening is to ask your pardon for the ambiguity of title under which the subject of lecture has been announced: for indeed I am not going to talk of kings, known as regnant, nor of treasuries, understood to contain wealth; but of quite another order of royalty, and another material of riches, than those usually acknowledged. I had even intended to ask your attention for a little while on trust, and (as sometimes one contrives, in taking a friend to see...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Montes the Matador and Other Stories

By: Frank Harris

YES! I'm better, and the doctor tells me I've escaped once more—as if I cared! And all through the fever you came every day to see me, so my niece says, and brought me the cool drink that drove the heat away and gave me sleep. You thought, I suppose, like the doctor, that I'd escape you, too. Ha! ha! And that you'd never hear old Montes tell what he knows of bull-fighting and you don't Or perhaps it was kindness; though, why you, a foreigner and a heretic, should be kind...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Temple Beau

By: Henry Fielding

Excerpt: Will?s has resign?d its old Pretence to Wit, And Beaux appear, where Criticks us?d to sit. Button himself, provok?d at Wit?s Decline, Now Lets his House, and swears he'll Burn his Sign. Ah! shou?d all others that on Wit depend, Like him, Provok?d; like him, their Dealings end; Our Theatres might take th? Example too, And Players starve themselves as Authors do. But, if the gay, the courtly World disdain To hear the Muses and their Sons complain; Each injur?d Bar...

Read More
  • Cover Image

A Wireless Message

By: Ambrose Bierce

In the summer of 1896 Mr. William Holt, a wealthy manufacturer of Chicago, was living temporarily in a little town of central New York, the name of which the writer's memory has not retained. Mr. Holt had had trouble with his wife, from whom he had parted a year before. Whether the trouble was anything more serious than incompatibility of temper, he is probably the only living person that knows: he is not addicted to the vice of confidences. Yet he has related the incide...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

By: Ida Husted Harper

THE death of no woman in the United States, — save one, perhaps — would call forth such widespread and eulogistic notice as that of Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, which occurred on October 26, at her home in New York City. The long and thoughtful editorial comments indicated not only the ability of the woman, but also the vitality of the cause of which she was a chief exponent. Mrs. Stanton herself, thinking, speaking, and writing with clearness and vigor on the living que...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Aeroplanes and Dirigibles of War

By: Frederick A. Talbot

Preface: Ever since the earliest days of the great conquest of the air, first by the dirigible balloon and then by the aeroplane, their use in time of war has been a fruitful theme for discussion. But their arrival was of too recent a date, their many utilities too unexplored to provide anything other than theories, many obviously untenable, others avowedly problematical.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Cone

By: Herbert George Wells

The night was hot and overcast, the sky red, rimmed with the lingering sunset of mid-summer. They sat at the open window, trying to fancy the air was fresher there. The trees and shrubs of the garden stood stiff and dark; beyond in the roadway a gaslamp burnt, bright orange against the hazy blue of the evening. Farther were the three lights of the railway signal against the lowering sky. The man and woman spoke to one another in low tones. He does not suspect? said the m...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Voodoo Trail

By: Maxwell Grant

Excerpt: THE two men by the fireplace were speaking in low tones, the subdued roll of their voices tuned to the crackle of the flames. They were alone in the living room of a sumptuous apartment, where heavy draperies muffled the night roar of Manhattan?s streets. They had the look of conspirators, this pair; a fact that would not have surprised certain police officials, for both men were notorious in criminal affairs.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The First Part of Henry the Fourth. Edited by Frederic W. Moorman

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: Actus Primus. Scoena Prima. Enter the King, Lord Iohn of Lancaster, Earle of Westmerland, with others. King. So shaken as we are, so wan with care, Finde we a time for frighted Peace to pant, And breath shortwinded accents of new broils To be commenc?d in Stronds a?farre remote: No more the thirsty entrance of this Soile, Shall daube her lippes with her owne childrens blood: No more shall trenching Warre channell her fields, Nor bruise her Flowrets with the Arme...

Read More
  • Cover Image

How to Tell a Story and Others

By: Mark Twain

Excerpt: HOW TO TELL A STORY The Humorous Story an American Development. Its Difference from Comic and Witty Stories. I do not claim that I can tell a story as it ought to be told. I only claim to know how a story ought to be told, for I have been almost daily in the company of the most expert story?tellers for many years. There are several kinds of stories, but only one difficult kind ? the humorous. I will talk mainly about that one. The humorous story is American, the...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The War of Steel and Gold; A Study of the Armed Peace

By: Henry N. Brailsford

Excerpt: A TRAVELLER who journeyed from London to Constantinople would remark in the changing landscape an eloquent variety of expression. No face could pass more obviously from confidence to caution, and from caution to fear than the plains and valleys through which his train would carry him. In the straggling villages, the little groups of isolated cottages and the lonely farm?houses of England and France or the Low Countries, he would read the evidences of an ancient ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Les Grandes Dames

By: Arsene Houssaye

Excerpt: Je pourrais m'enorgueillir du succes de ce roman, si je ne croyais beaucoup aux bonnes fortunes litteraires. L'opinion est comme la mer qui prend un navire pour le conduire au rivage ou pour l'abimer dans la tempete, selon le mouvement de ses caprices. La premiere edition des Grandes Dames a paru au mois de mai 1868, en quatre volumes in?8 deg. imprimes a cinq mille exemplaires. Quelques jours apres, Dentu m'envoyait cette depeche: ?Reimprimons encore cinq mille...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Dio's Rome, Vol. 4

By: Cassius Dio

Excerpt: [?1?] My record has so far stated what the Romans both did and endured for seven hundred and twenty?five years under the monarchy, as a democracy, and beneath the rule of a few. After this they reverted to nothing more nor less than a state of monarchy again, although Caesar had a plan to lay down his arms and entrust affairs to the senate and the populace. He held a consultation on the subject with Agrippa and Maecenas, to whom he communicated all his secrets. ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Lucasta

By: Richard Lovelace

Introduction: There is scarcely an UN?DRAMATIC writer of the Seventeenth Century, whose poems exhibit so many and such gross corruptions as those of the author of LUCASTA. In the present edition, which is the first attempt to present the productions of a celebrated and elegant poet to the admirers of this class of literature in a readable shape, both the text and the pointing have been amended throughout, the original reading being always given in the foot? notes; but so...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Socrates

By: Voltaire

Excerpt: My dear confidants, my dear agents, you know how much money I made you during the last festival of Ceres. I'm getting married and I hope you will do your duty on this grand occasion.

Read More
 
1
|
2
|
3
Records: 1 - 20 of 45 - Pages: 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.